in the wrong galaxy

fuckyeahfashioncouture:

Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2014

fuckyeahfashioncouture:

Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2014

(via at-the-corner-down-the-street)


(via vixuss)


(Source: lacooletchic, via ephe)


burnedshoes:

THE LIFE OF OLIVE COTTON (1911-2003)

10 years ago, in October 2003, Australian photographer Olive Cotton died in a hospital in Cowra, Australia, with her second husband Ross McInerney by her side.

She discovered the art of photography in her childhood and stayed committed to it all her life.

"My mother was a very artistic person and my younger sister was good at drawing and painting and I was hopeless. And I felt like something wanted to burst out of its shell and I didn’t know how to go about it. And then one of my father’s younger sisters said, 'Somebody has given me a wonderful new camera for my birthday, could you use this little Box brand number?' And that was a big thrill and I still have negatives made by that.”

She has a long history going back to the 1930s, when her modernist Teacup Ballet was hung in London, along with her landscapes, Light and Shade and Only to taste the warmth, the light, the wind and the portrait of her first husband Max Dupain, called Max After Surfing.

 
OLIVE COTTON & MAX DUPAIN

Cotton and Dupain were childhood friends and, although she graduated in English and mathematics from the University of Sydney in 1934, her interest in photography led her to work in Dupain’s studio from this year. She was employed as a photographer’s assistant in the studio, however she worked assiduously on her own work and continued to exhibit in photography salon exhibitions.

Cotton married Max Dupain in 1939, though the marriage lasted only two years. Cotton managed Dupain’s Sydney studio during World War II (with Dupain away on service) before she married Ross McInerney and moved to the bush near Koorawatha. For 20 years she had no access to darkroom facilities, but kept taking photographs. She resumed her professional career in 1963.

In 1964, Cotton opened a small studio in Cowra and took local portraits, weddings and commissions. After a 40 year absence from the city art scene she re-emerged in 1985 with her first solo show at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney, she then concentrated on rediscovering and printing her life’s work. (read more: +, ++)


IMAGE INFO:
#1: Surf’s edge, ca. 1935
#2: Max (Dupain) in shadows, ca.1935
#3: Interior - Shadow from my window, 1933
#4: The patterned road, 1938
#5: Only to taste the warmth, the light, the wind, ca. 1939
#6: The Budapest String Quartet, 1937
#7: Woolloomooloo free kindergarten, ca. 1939
#8+9: Portraits of Olive Cotton, Koorawatha, New South Wales, 1992

(via journalofanobody)


(Source: gallowhill, via waisenkind)


likeafieldmouse:

Jorma Puranen - Shadows, Reflections and All That Sort of Thing (1991-2009)

"By ‘images’ [eikona] I mean first shadows [skias], then reflections on water [phantasmata] and other close-grained, polished surfaces, and all that sort of thing…"

Plato, The Republic, Book VII

Artist’s statement:

"Within museum photography, dramatic use of light and shade were avoided; rather, light was used to give uniformity to a series, regardless of difference of photographed objects.

My emphasis, however, is not placed on the relation of the original and copy, but drawing attention to the photographic process itself, complexity of gaze, to convey arresting sense of presence, to evoke an exalted attention.

With intensive raking light I wish to bring to our attention the surface of the painting, with its shiny areas, its hidden colors and its cracks.

The original focus of the painting, a face, seem to hover behind, between and beyond the material layers of the painting. Looking at paintings from unusual angles evokes in the viewer the sense of vulnerability emerged from the tension between a moment and permanence, a flash of light and centuries old patina.

Photography´s capacity to register reflections is actually its singular gift. What other medium deals so expressively with the play of light and shadow? Furthermore, by veiling the faces in light, the photograph actually reinvests them with mystery. In the face of their own reality, these pictures remain blind, just as at the same time they open our eyes to the ‘destiny’ of the sitters.  

I fetch my portraits through the past of their painted existence and the actuality of the photographs materializes them as transitory bodies.”

(via amoryingloriousblaine)

wi-ch:

MIRAGE OF SOME FACES I KNOW, YOU KNOW WHEN ASPHALT ON A HOT DAY FROM FAR AWAY LOOKS LIKE THE SEA
60 x 70 cmoil on canvas2014

wi-ch:

MIRAGE OF SOME FACES I KNOW, YOU KNOW WHEN ASPHALT ON A HOT DAY FROM FAR AWAY LOOKS LIKE THE SEA

60 x 70 cm
oil on canvas
2014

(via plaxtic)


(Source: onlyaffect, via hankeatspaint)


artwork by Walid Elsawi

A dozen statements, taken from the artist’s ongoing interview project are written on glowing neon boxes, peppered around the space. The interview consists of responses he gives to the question “are you an artist?” a means of exploring the current climate of contemporary art, and the cult of personality, with a tongue-in-cheek emphasis on certain stereotypes, perceived pre-requisites or trends. (via massalexandria)

(Source: mister-nobody, via textposter)

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